Friday, 29 August 2014

What's your favourite ice-cream? C1 level


For English classes via Skype, Contact Lisa by email lis.j.grant@gmail.com or Whatsapp 0034645424237.

 

The best caramel ice-cream: taste test

Is Ben & Jerry's Caramel Chew Chew the ultimate incarnation of this ice-cream flavour, or can the supermarkets' own brands compare? We put them to the test
Everybody loves ice-cream, right? As we bask in the last rays (and/or torrential rains) of the British summer, it seems only fitting to end the holidays with a spoon firmly stuck into a tub of frozen cream and swirly sweet "bits". We asked the big high-street players to send us their best rivals to that Guardian food desk – nay, national – favourite, Ben & Jerry's Caramel Chew Chew. But how did the own brands compare?

Ben & Jerry's Caramel Chew Chew

 You know the drill: thick, dense ice-cream; well-distributed swirls of intense caramel (the listed salt presumably giving it its slight savoury edge); rich, chocolatey caramel cups that, crucially, melt readily; and, overall, an ice-cream of smooth, fulsome flavours that stops just short of sickliness. As Ben or Jerry might say, it's a doozy.

Marks & Spencer, The Ultimate Caramel Ice-Cream

 A grownup, bits-free caramel ice-cream made in the West Country with whole milk and whipping cream. The caramel flavour is a little meek and it finishes with a curious twang (there is salt and concentrated lemon juice in there, which may explain that). A cashmere jumper of an ice-cream: silky-smooth and supposedly sophisticated but, ultimately, rather boring.
5/10

Waitrose, Heston from Waitrose Salted Caramel Popcorn Ice-Cream,

"All your cinema favourites rolled into one …" to create a, well, horrific video nasty. You know how eating popcorn is a bit like eating bird feed and Styrofoam? Well, imagine that in an ice-cream also packed with hard shards of salted caramel. True, they have a great treacly, brown sugar flavour, but it is a textural nightmare. Like The Godfather III or Sex Lives of the Potato Men, this is what happens when no one has the backbone to take the talent to one side and say: "You know what, Heston? This is a rubbish idea."
2/10

Aldi, Gianni's Cheeky Monkey Ice-Cream

 "Chocolate flavour dairy ice-cream with a marshmallow flavour sauce, caramel flavoured sauce and chocolate flavour monkey face shapes." Note: everything in that list is a "flavour" of, a doppelganger for not the actual thing. That can be nice. The dark, cocoa powder profile of the incredibly dense ice-cream is not unpleasant. The "marshmallow" sauce, however, is terrible. Those "chocolate flavour" faces taste cheap and oily but melt readily and, hey, while a zoologist might quibble, they do look reasonably like monkeys. The whole shebang gets sickly quickly.
For kids? 6/10. Adults? 4/10

Sainsbury's, Taste the Difference Toffee and Honeycomb Ice-Cream

Cynically, you may read the blurb – "farmhouse … Devon … handmade toffee sauce … milk from Jersey cows … fresh, natural ingredients …" – and roll your eyes. But taste it and you will eat, if not your words, then a large portion. This is extra-thick, supra-creamy ice-cream that has its own coolly understated toffee flavour, but it is those thick seams of toffee sauce – salted, beautifully rich, long on dark muscovado notes – that are sensational. I found cant "crisp honeycomb"; it appeared to have melted into the ice-cream. Nonetheless, a mature alternative to Caramel Chew Chew.
8/10

Tesco Finest West Country Fudge Ice-Cream

Lustrously thick, velvety ice-cream whose fudgy flavour is well modulated. It becomes gradually more concentrated as you progress through the ice-cream, yielding fudge pieces to a knockout sauce – which, although supposedly rippled, does tend to collect in swirled cores. Should you want to mix'n'match, Tesco Finest's chocolate (£3) is also impressive: 70% Tanzanian cocoa solids give it a fruity, black forest gateau-like character. 7/10

Asda, Chewy Chewy Caramel

Full marks for testing the patience of Ben & Jerry's lawyers with that name, but the ice-cream itself feels a little thin and overly aerated (its chief ingredient appears to be reconstituted skimmed milk). It is also "loaded" with nearly 27% toffee sauce (excellent), caramel pieces and milk chocolate caramel cups, but those cups lack instant meltability (real chocolate, see?) and the sauce is timid.
5/10

Source - The Guardian - 28th August 2014

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2014/aug/27/best-caramel-ice-cream-taste-test


Vocabulary Builder:

incarnation - (noun) a person who embodies in the flesh a deity, spirit, or quality.

bask - (verb) lie exposed to warmth and light, typically from the sun, for relaxation or pleasure.

swirly - (adj) movin =g in or characterized by swirling shapes or patterns.

muscovado - (noun) unrefined sugar made from the juice of sugar cane by evaporating it and draining off the molasses.

doozy - (noun) north american informal, something outstanding or unique of its kind.

meek - (adj) quiet, gentle, and easily imposed on; submissive.

twang - (noun)  a strong taste or flavour which stands out, can also be used to describe a nasal sound.

aerated - (adj) (of a liquid) made effervescent by being charged with carbon dioxide or some other gas. (verb) introduce air to a material.

Styrofoam - (noun) (Trademark) a kind of expanded polystyrene used especially food containers.

treacly - (adj) resembling treacle in consistency, taste or appearance.

doppelganger - (noun) a apparition or double of a living person (or in this case, ice-cream).


Questions for Students 

 Taste experiment; Choose 2 supermarkets in your area and 2 ice-creams and compare, just like they've done in the article above.
Is ice-cream over rated?
Where do they make the best ice-cream?

For English classes via Skype, Contact Lisa by email lis.j.grant@gmail.com or Whatsapp 0034645424237.

 


 

 



Thursday, 28 August 2014

Today's article - B2 Level

 

The Tomatina Festival - Buñol

The world-famous festival has been held in the Valencian town of Buñol on the last Wednesday of August since 1945. The event sees tens of thousands of tourists join the town’s 9,000 inhabitants to throw tonnes of tomatoes at one another .

An estimated 20,000 people descended on the town of Buñol in the east of Spain on Wednesday for the annual La Tomatina tomato fight – often billed as the world’s largest food fight – to hurl tomatoes for an hour in a storm of pulp and crimson.

The tradition began in the mid-1940s, though its origins are unclear. The festival’s garish new official website attributes it to a foodfight that broke out in the town in 1945 during the ‘parade of giant heads’ and had to be broken up by the police.

The food fight was banned in the early 1950s until 1957 when the locals held a funeral for a giant tomato in protest, parading it around town in a coffin, and successfully had the ban repealed. 

The town hall introduced a ticketing system in 2013, limiting the event’s attendance to 20,000 people.

Private tour companies sell tickets and accommodation in the nearby city of Valencia. Those willing to spend more can buy a coveted space on the back of the trucks that carry the tomatoes to the town, for an additional fee of €750. 

Over 100 tonnes of tomatoes are brought to the town and thrown during the hour-long fight, at an estimated total cost of €140,000, or €2,300 a minute.

The tomato fight, which takes place every year on the last Wednesday of August, is the culmination of a week-long celebration made up of street parties, fireworks and food fairs. The night before the fight, participants compete in a paella cooking contest.

There are two signals for the food fight to begin: the firing of the water cannon and the first successful attempt to climb the Palo Jabón, a greasy pole with a piece of ham on top, and knock the ham off its perch.

One tour website explains: ‘Technically the festival does not begin until one brave soul has climbed to the top of a two-story high, greased-up wooden pole and reached the coveted ham at the top. In practice this process takes a long time and the festival starts despite no one reaching the meaty prize.’ 

In recent years the festival has become so popular that organisers have had to turn tens of thousands of people away. In 2012, an estimated 40,000 revellers – more than four times the town’s population – made the journey to Buñol to take part.

 The fight begins at 11am with the firing of water cannon, and ends an hour later when they are fired again. According to the rules, participants must stop throwing tomatoes as soon as they hear the second round of cannon fire.

The tomato festival has become a global phenomenon, with copycat events staged at one time or another in Colombia, China, the US and Chile. The videogame Tekken 6 includes a battle arena based on the Tomatina, in which characters fight while surrounded by tomato-hurling revellers. 

The clean-up begins in the afternoon, when fire engines move in to spray down the streets. According to one tour site: ‘Once the tomato pulp is flushed, the ground is clean due to the acidity of the tomato.’

Source: The Guardian; Thursday 28th August 2014

Vocabulary builder:
Crimson - (adj) A rich deep red colour inclining to purple. (Noun) A rich deep red colour inclining to purple. (Verb) of a persons face, become flushed, especially through embarrassment.

Garish - (adj) obtrusively bright and showy. Synonyms - Loud, wover-bright, harsh, showy, etc.

Coveted - (Verb) Yearn to possess (Something, especially something belonging to another).

Questions for students

Do you know of any other festival which is as messy as the Tomatina Festival?
I would like to hear about your experiences at the Tomatina Festival or any other Festival?

For information about Skype classes, please contact Lisa  by email lis.j.grant@gmail.com or whatsapp 0034645424237.

Thank you for reading!



Wednesday, 27 August 2014

Aprende ingles desde tu sofa!

Hola!
Quieren aprender ingles sin moverte de tu sofa? Aqui teneis vuestra oportunidad!

Si te gustaria aprender ingles desde tu sofa... Apuntate a mis classes!
Es mas comodo hacer las clases desde tu casa, las clases son mas economicos, horas flexibles (no tiene que ser a la misma hora cada semana)
Las clases incluyen;

Study from your home
Short, interesting texts
Conversations with corrections
Vocabulary building
Pronunciation training
Teacher's notes automatically saved on your skype account!

Classes are tailor made to your needs! 
I have experience in Marketing, Tourism, Travel, Communication, IT, etc.
Call 0034645424237
Or email lis.j.grant@Gmail.com 

Its fun, its easy and you will learn fast!


About Me

My photo

Hello,


If you have read my blog and want to know more about me ... please read on!


Where are you from?

The short answer would be the south of England, but this is not strictly true.  I was born in Bahrain, and I've lived in Spain, Scotland and England.  When I worked for First Choice (Tour operator), I was sent to work in Almeria, Tenerife, Malaga, Corfu and Bulgaria! Then I moved to Brighton. I had a great time there and met some amazing people (you know who you are)! From there I moved to Alicante to become a teacher.  I got a better teaching position in Toledo with Cambridge English plus, there I spent my days correcting exams, teaching kids and Adults... and now I am residing in Ciudad Real with my life partner.


Why did you become an English teacher?

I've always liked the idea of teaching, but I figured it was a good idea to get some life experience before trying to teach. So, that's what I did! I have worked in tourism, insurance, marketing, health and safety, bars and restaurants! Work experience gives you heaps of anecdotes and stories to teach your students about real life!


Why did you decide to become self-employed?

Well, it was an easy decision, I wanted the freedom and flexibility to teach English through numerous activities, cooking, wine tasting, playing games, etc.  When you work in a school/academy/college you teach the same thing day in day out, students get bored of sitting down at a desk with a book open in front of them, having done this during school hours as well. Through experience I've learnt that it's easier to learn a language when you actually live it! Kids in Spain learn grammar at school, they know how the language works, but they don't get the opportunity to speak.


Why online classes?

I wanted to be able to teach other nationalities and maybe provide a service to people who can't leave their house, or live out in a small village where they don't have access to a language school. Teaching online is intense, it doesn't suit everyone, but the students I have are happy with the classes.


Are online classes better than in person?

If there is a good internet connection, and the student is keen to learn online, then it can be good, but I wouldn't say it was better than in person. Learning online is intense, you have to constantly pay attention, your teacher is able to provide you with visual aids, class notes, etc. You save money on petrol and you save time! When technology improves, it will be possible to join a group, which should be cheaper for you and give you the opportunity to meet other students from around the world!


How do you fill your time?


Well, I keep a blog for my students, the number of readers are increasing everyday, which is encouraging. I won't talk about politics, religion or any subject which may offend any nationality. It's purpose is to give students something to read, which may interest them. Helping them to learn new vocabulary and expressions. I also teach at a nursery in the mornings, and one evening a week I teach children and their parents together! This gives parents the opportunity to learn with their children, making it easier to practise at home. ifriendlymft.blogspot.com English can become part of your everyday lives!


My teenage group are new, and I love teaching them!

ifriendlyteen.blogspot.com


iFriendly Summer project:


Every year I look into summer camps and the options I have to teach during our long hot summers... I have to say there is quite a wide variety of summer camps here in Spain, United Kingdom and Ireland.  I have worked for the Junta de Andalucia and Combination Languages in the U.K. http://www.combinationlanguages.com/


I love Castilla La Mancha and I would rather stay and teach closer to home... I think I have found what I am looking for.  A stunning little village not 50 minutes from my City... Saceruela.


This year I intend to set up a summer camp for kids, aged 10 -16 from the local schools and academies. In 2016 / 17 I intend to attract students from the U.K and Ireland, those who want to learn Spanish, so that we can teach both languages together.  This will enable iFriendly to provide activities for both nationalities and give everyone the chance to learn from each other. A similar set up to my 'Invasion Friendly' project in Brighton, where Spanish speakers and English speakers got together every week to learn from each other in a social environment. This will also be available for adult learners, but on weekends throughout the year.


Invasion Friendly "To promote cultural integration and change. Give the word invasion new meaning. A safe way for travellers to learn languages."


Check out this stunning village saceruela.blogspot.com


I teach English through wine tasting events in Ciudad Real, at Taberna Vinalia https://www.facebook.com/iluminavinalia?fref=ts#_=_. Check out our events on Facebook.


From April 2014 to December 2014, I worked on a Tourism project in Toledo, due to the long commute I no longer teach the course.


And last but not least, I teach English online!


For Skype English classes Contact Lisa Jane by email lis.j.grant@gmail.com

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